Are Easements Recorded?

Not all easements are recorded.

If they have been recorded, they can be lost after many years or changes of land ownership.

If you purchase property with an eye towards development, the discovery of a lot or unrecorded easement deed, which is still a legal document, can cause problems.

Where are easements recorded?

Locating Records

The property deed is recorded through the county courthouse. However, the final location of the record may vary depending on the age of the record and the county’s record keeping system. Most counties maintain deeds at either the Assessor’s Office or the County Clerk’s Office.

Are easements considered real property?

n. the right to use the real property of another for a specific purpose. The easement is itself a real property interest, but legal title to the underlying land is retained by the original owner for all other purposes.

What does it mean to have an easement on your property?

An easement is a legal right to use another’s land for a specific limited purpose. In other words, when someone is granted an easement, he is granted the legal right to use the property, but the legal title to the land itself remains with the owner of the land.

What is the difference between a right of way and an easement?

A right of way is an easement that allows another person to travel or pass through your land. The most common form of public right of way is a road or path through your land in order to access a public area. A private right of way is to allow a neighbor to cut through your property to make his access easier.

Can you refuse an easement?

As the owner, you have a legal right to grant or to deny someone’s request for an easement on your property. No one can simply impose an easement on you. However, if the easement is sought by a public entity like a local government or utility, your denial may be challenged in court.

What are the three types of easements?

There are three common types of easements.

  • Easement in gross. In this type of easement, only property is involved, and the rights of other owners are not considered.
  • Easement appurtenant.
  • Prescriptive Easement.

Can I put a fence on an easement?

If you set a fence inside your property line and your neighbor is able to use the property outside of the line, that portion of your property may fall under prescriptive easement. Legally, this is a type of property easement that is earned by regular use of the property.

Who owns an easement?

An easement is a property right that gives its holder an interest in land that’s owned by someone else. It’s common for people to lack a clear understanding of easements and the numerous legal problems that can arise in their creation, interpretation, and implementation. Luckily, you’ve come to the right place.

Can you be forced to give an easement?

Since an easement on your property typically forms some type of burden on you, you have the right to deny that easement if you choose. However, with both public and private easements, the entity may take you to court in specific cases and a judge may force the easement on you when they deem it a necessity or relevant.

How long do easements last?

An easement usually is written so that it lasts forever. This is known as a perpetual easement. Where state law allows, an easement may be written for a specified period of years; this is known as a term easement. Only gifts of perpetual easement, however, can qualify a donor for income- and estate-tax benefits.

Who has to maintain an easement?

Property Easement Maintenance

Basically, the person or party using an easement, known as an easement holder, has a duty to maintain it. Easement holders don’t become owners of the land attached to their easements, though, and within limits the actual landowners retain most rights over it.

Can a property owner block an easement?

Generally, an easement’s use and access can’t be blocked unless thee is cause for termination. Once an easement is created, the owner of the easement has the right and the duty to maintain the easement for its purpose unless otherwise agreed between the owner of the easement and the owner of the underlying property.